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    philipo
    Senior Member

  • philipo
    replied
    An NCAA athlete cheating?? Surely not.🙄

    Leave a comment:

  • Gabriella
    Junior Member

  • Gabriella
    replied
    Originally posted by RunUnlimited View Post

    "Divine" Oduduru, I believe is the athlete you are talking about.... Turned 25 last October. Ran for Texas Tech University. Made headlines by winning the NCAA Division 1 Outdoor Championship 100m/200m double in wind legal times of 9.88 (+0.8m/s) and 19.73 (+0.8m/s) on the same day in 2019.
    I couldn't possibly comment...

    Leave a comment:

  • RunUnlimited
    Senior Member

  • RunUnlimited
    replied
    Originally posted by Gabriella View Post
    Yes, Athlete 2 is alleged to be a 25 yr old, fellow Nigerian, in the same training group as Okagbare, with links to Texas. He also has a 'spiritual' name.....
    "Divine" Oduduru, I believe is the athlete you are talking about.... Turned 25 last October. Ran for Texas Tech University. Made headlines by winning the NCAA Division 1 Outdoor Championship 100m/200m double in wind legal times of 9.88 (+0.8m/s) and 19.73 (+0.8m/s) on the same day in 2019.
    RunUnlimited
    Senior Member
    Last edited by RunUnlimited; 14-01-22, 04:26.

    Leave a comment:

  • Occasional Hope
    Senior Member

  • Occasional Hope
    replied
    Anyway these e-mails undermine the alleged defence quoted up thread that
    “I was taking HGH without my knowledge in products provided by my coach.”
    . She was clearly quite knowingly taking stuff she knew would fail a test.

    Leave a comment:

  • Gabriella
    Junior Member

  • Gabriella
    replied
    Yes, Athlete 2 is alleged to be a 25 yr old, fellow Nigerian, in the same training group as Okagbare, with links to Texas. He also has a 'spiritual' name.....

    Leave a comment:

  • Ladyloz
    Senior Member

  • Ladyloz
    replied
    I think the male athlete is also Nigerian.

    Leave a comment:

  • SprintRelayFan
    Senior Member

  • SprintRelayFan
    commented on 's reply
    The hamstring thing is driving me crazy. I feel I should know
  • Occasional Hope
    Senior Member

  • Occasional Hope
    replied
    US authorities have charged the person who supplied Blessing Okagbare and another, unnamed, athlete (a male with an injured hamstring): Man charged with supplying performance-enhancing drugs to Olympians, including Nigerian sprinter Blessing Okagbare (espn.com)

    Eric Lira Charged in First Olympics Anti-Doping Prosecution (lawandcrime.com)

    Leave a comment:

  • LoveSprints1
    Senior Member

  • LoveSprints1
    commented on 's reply
    They split some time ago 2019/2020 I've been told. Neita is an ex-girlfriend so don't link them. CJ had been in the US training with Reider. Freckleton is listed as his coach but that's meaningless if his athlete is on the other side of the world paying and being coached by someone else. Can't wait to see how this one all unravels.
  • SprintRelayFan
    Senior Member

  • SprintRelayFan
    replied
    AIU published today on blessing - hgh, epo and obstructing the investigation. She denies all charges

    Leave a comment:

  • Occasional Hope
    Senior Member

  • Occasional Hope
    replied
    Nesta Carter now a two-time offender: Jamaican sprinter Carter tests positive for banned substance again (insidethegames.biz)

    Leave a comment:

  • larkim
    Senior Member

  • larkim
    commented on 's reply
    Mental health matters where people come from well off and more than adequate backgrounds too. I've got personal experience of two people in my family who got close to taking their own lives because they couldn't handle some of the pressures on themselves, pressures which I'd just take in my stride, and pressures which I'd have said those people were more than well equipped to deal with. So don't give me this crap about people excusing personal inadequacies; it's offensive, wrong, morally bankrupt and narrow minded. People are people, mental health can be frail despite outwards appearances, and if you've gone through your life without being exposed to people with those sorts of challenges, I'm jealous of you. At the end of the day, all pro athletes are just human like the rest of us and deserve the dignity of being helped to stay well, physically and mentally. If Ujah had taken a contaminated supplement, utterly without his knowledge, and the contamination had been a poison of some sort, would you leave him at the door of A&E telling him it was his own fault for his personal inadequacies? In the real world, rather than the quaint 1950s world that you seem to inhabit, mental health problems wreck lives across all ages, backgrounds, communities etc. I'm sure some people do use the current "trend" of mental health to mask some personal flaws of their own. But that doesn't mean that every flawed individual shouldn't be able to be open about any genuine mental health challenges they are facing and get support from whatever community they are part of, whether that's elite athletics or any other walk of life.
  • larkim
    Senior Member

  • larkim
    commented on 's reply
    The point about "as flawed as the rest of us" is not made so that we shrug our shoulders and say "hey, s&1t happens from time to time". Of course pro athletes have an absolute responsibility to adhere to the rules / laws etc and of course they are entirely responsible for what goes into their bodies. If they misread a label or fail to keep up with what is or isn't allowed then they are absolutely as guilty as the intentional doper. My point was more that if we take a step back and recognise that mistakes and errors do happen, most of us go through our lives without making a mistake that has such enormous consequences. I can just see that if someone does make a stupid mistake and they are an individual 800m runner for example, the only person they have to deal with letting down is themselves. I think mentally that would be easier to deal with. But for a sprinter in a relay team once you've dealt with the selfish part about losing your own medal and the impact on you, there's the impact on the others. For some (not everyone) that burden could become so overwhelming. The last thing I want to read, especially if he is an unintentional doper, is that he's taken his own life because he couldn't handle what he'd done to others. 999 times out of 1000 it wouldn't come to that. But at some point it will, unless there is some form of support put in place.
  • SprintRelayFan
    Senior Member

  • SprintRelayFan
    commented on 's reply
    Ah I didn’t even know neita was his girlfriend, that’s how out of the loop I am.
    I assumed he’d replaced gemili as that’s what the commentaters said at the time - maybe as kilty was in the team that ran the record?
  • Sprintfan
    Member

  • Sprintfan
    commented on 's reply
    Blokes serving time probably get mental health support.
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