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  • Occasional Hope
    commented on 's reply
    Good point. In fact, two good points. It's not looking good for CJ...

  • Dundee42
    replied
    But wouldn't 2 banned ingredients in the supplement be unlikely? Surely he wouldn't be the only person taking the supplement so wouldn't there be a plethora of positive cases?

    Leave a comment:


  • Occasional Hope
    replied
    I do think a supplement is at least possible as ostarine has a history of being found as an unheralded ingredient.

    Leave a comment:


  • Occasional Hope
    commented on 's reply
    He's the most high profile British athlete to be positive since Dwain Chambers.

  • Occasional Hope
    commented on 's reply
    Not surprising really - Darren had already lost an Olympic title to someone we're pretty sure was doping in Sydney.

  • Dundee42
    replied
    Sad whether it was deliberate or otherwise as I've always thought cj was anything but a doper, be interesting to see what the reason was when it unravels.
    I just hope we don't get fed alot of burrito bullshit or similar.

    Leave a comment:


  • sidelined
    replied
    Does anyone know how long this stuff stays in the body? I'm wondering when he would have consumed it. The team had already been in Japan for - what - three weeks or so.

    I'm finding this extremely depressing, whatever the true story is.

    Leave a comment:


  • LoveSprints1
    commented on 's reply
    It was Darren Campbell.

  • Grassmarket
    commented on 's reply
    This is very true, actually. Have a look at Uk Sports doping list sometime. It is never well-known names in any sport. It’s always second-rate rugby players, boxers with losing records, third division cyclists etc etc. Guys just hanging on by their fingernails to status of “Professional Athletes”

  • JamieSLA
    commented on 's reply
    I think it was Darren Campbell that took exception to Chambers, could be wrong.

  • jjimbojames
    commented on 's reply
    Absolutely, but I do think it’s harder to be as distant when people remember athletes coming up the ranks, train with / race against them etc - and it’s really rare for British athletes to be caught, so it’s less of a “oh, another one” etc.

    Interesting responses on Twitter, with some athletes silent, some backing him. General population seems to be livid for the other relay boys or people from other countries berating the “Brits Don’t Dope” mentality. Ironically, some saying it’s because Brits are protected, when it’s a Brit that’s been caught!

  • trickstat
    commented on 's reply
    That was particularly pointless. However, they did seem to have an effect as, at the age of 24 having been competing in the sport since she was about 13, she hadn't broken 12 seconds.

  • larkim
    commented on 's reply
    Ladyloz - yes, but even then they are putting faith in a batch process which they have no control over. It's fine to retain 1 in the box of 20 supplement tablets each time as evidence too, but even then the strict liability would mean they are bang to rights if a substance is found; so in Ujah's case, the silver medal would be gone no matter whether he was at fault or not.

  • Ursus
    replied
    Ujah’s apparently already said to British Athletics that he doesn’t know how the drugs got in his system.

    Which may be true. But we’ve heard all this before so many times and if it was an American for instance we’d pretty much all be saying “yeah, whatever”.

    Leave a comment:


  • trevorp
    replied
    Originally posted by Ladyloz View Post
    ... there are incentives to dope beyond winning medals and running super quick times too.
    True - remember Bernice Wilson who gorged on stuff to take her to the giddy heights of 11.57/23.77.

    Leave a comment:

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