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2021 Indoors

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  • Occasional Hope
    commented on 's reply
    I think you've missed it...

  • jolinemelina
    replied
    Eagerly waiting for the EURO's.Even though we might be watching at home it's gonna be awesome.The Belgians are taking this😄

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  • Pierre Johansson
    replied
    May have to revise my opinion about Boling's win in the NCAA Indoors. Terrance Laird's 19.81 yesterday probably means Boling did "quite" well in that final...

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  • Paps
    commented on 's reply
    I'm reserving judgement - I think an indoor 200 track is going to exaggerate any technical issues, especially for the bigger guys like Bolling. He's still got scope for progress for sure, but I wouldn't say it's just raw talent.

  • philipo
    replied
    Originally posted by Pierre Johansson View Post
    Does anyone else think it looks like Matthew Boling is just running on pure talent at the moment, and that there's a LOT that could (and should!) be improved (technique-wise) in the future? 20.19 in the 200 and a first 400 relay split in 45.28 less than 30 minutes later are obviously world-class results, but he still looks like a diamond in the rough IMO.
    What makes Boling in a tough position is the quantity of high quality opponents in the USA college and pro ranks; i am mindful as you are that its March and Boling and others have, or may have, their high point of the season gone in March. The point of interest is how many of the talented athletes we saw at Indoors will turn pro quickly; the temptations are considerable.

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  • philipo
    replied
    Originally posted by Occasional Hope View Post
    Mu was beaten in the NCAA 400. (In the same race Amber Anning ran her second pb of the championships, 51.83.)
    Mu has great talent but all here know that does not mean you are bound to win any particular race and it has happened many times before; tactics, especially indoors, are and were paramount; Mu's great leg in the relay tells us that she may be a great 800m runner if not 400m competitor. Every time the so called unbeatable lose I am reminded, as you may be also be, of Coe in 1980 in Moscow.
    There were some majestic performances this week end,and the track and those shoes ?? may well have helped; The efforts by Harrison, Cole Hocker, Gittens, the Jamaican 60m womens champion, and others impressed as always in this NCAA indoor champs; I wonder how many will disappear in a couple of years; how many will go on to be world class at the Globals. The future expectation is fascinating, is it not.?

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  • Pierre Johansson
    commented on 's reply
    Yes, those last 50 meters looked terrible. I was actually surprised he could hold off Terrance Laird. I just hope he gets a good coach once he leaves Georgia. He could probably become the first athlete to run sub-10 in the 100, sub-20 in the 200, sub-45 in the 400 and jump over 8 meters in the long jump, but unless he makes some adjustments to his running form, he's probably going to be more of a Lemaitre than a Bobby Morrow if you know what I mean.

  • Pierre Johansson
    commented on 's reply
    Speaking of Allyson Felix, I'm of the opinion that she should've focused solely on the 400. I think she could've been a sub-48 runner. She was never going to beat Griffith Joyner's world record anyway, and her body and technique were made for the 400.

  • jjimbojames
    commented on 's reply
    I think the double peak has to affect things, but SRR was dominant on the circuit and then fell apart at a Champs. I think she struggled to mentally hold it together, and the pressure and comparison to a gold-medal winning Felix was also a factor. The two of them were the face of T&F in the US, but Allyson won a lot more silverware and was the US press darling (neither the 400m or 200m were peak eras, but I’d say the 200m was really just between AF and VCB for most of AF’s peak, to be fair).

  • Occasional Hope
    replied
    Mu was beaten in the NCAA 400. (In the same race Amber Anning ran her second pb of the championships, 51.83.)
    Last edited by Occasional Hope; 14-03-21, 11:58.

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  • trickstat
    commented on 's reply
    I think you may be right there. He does rock and roll a lot. At the end of a 200, for example, his speed endurance seems to just about carry him through while his form gets even rougher. If he could just hold what form he has he would finish better.

    He reminds me a little of Christophe Lemaitre. There are some differences as I've not known Lemaitre to run 400s and Boling also appears to have a better pick-up.

  • Pierre Johansson
    replied
    Does anyone else think it looks like Matthew Boling is just running on pure talent at the moment, and that there's a LOT that could (and should!) be improved (technique-wise) in the future? 20.19 in the 200 and a first 400 relay split in 45.28 less than 30 minutes later are obviously world-class results, but he still looks like a diamond in the rough IMO.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pierre Johansson
    replied
    Originally posted by LoveSprints1 View Post
    BTW I always thought Chrissy O capable of beating everyone, as she proved time after time.
    I feel like Richards-Ross was rarely at her best when it mattered the most, while Ohuruogu almost always delivered her best performances at the World Champs and Olympics. Of course, in Richards-Ross' defense, as a member of the US national team she had to peak twice in the same year while Ohuruogu could focus solely on the Olympics/World Champs.

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  • Occasional Hope
    replied
    Good pb for Finley Mclear over in the US: 1.45.91.

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  • LoveSprints1
    replied
    Originally posted by paul View Post
    Long ago I had another utopian athletics fantasy - that Ohuruogu could beat Richards. The I-dont-really-understand-how-sport-works brigade then said much the same as you, @LoveSprints1: that Richards is in a different league altogether to Ohuruogu and Ohuruogu will never beat her. In fact, though, Ohuruogu's competitive record when the chips are down (i.e. in global individual finals) is better than Richards' by every measure. Not just one-off. Time after time. (To the extent that when Richards finally did manage to sneak one, in 2012, it was truly heroic - truly brave and glorious - the underdog story of an overdog!) Was Richards the better time-trialist? Yes, by a huge margin. Is that all there is to sport? No. :-)
    You said “not only can Keely beat Mu.” Of course if Mu is injured or exhausted by a long season she is beatable but in a head to head at this point she is in a different league from either Keely or Izzy. They are both fabulous athletes, but Mu is equivalent to an Alyson Felix or a Usain Bolt. I would never suggest anyone on this forum does not know about athletics. We are all here because we love the sport and we share our thoughts and opinions and disagree too, amidst good humoured banter. I’ve watched Mu for three years and seen the savvy decisions she has made as a very young athlete, and her racing brain. She is a rare talent, not unbeatable of course but I don’t think I will be swallowing my spikes any time soon.

    BTW I always thought Chrissy O capable of beating everyone, as she proved time after time.

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