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  • #16
    A new Olympic selection policy from UKA (http://www.uka.org.uk/performance/20...tion-policies/).
    Big change is a set of standards to for acceptance of World Ranking Invitation places. These are still very tough but might give some athletes a chance to force their way on the team.

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    • #17
      Also the return of the future medal potential clause which should give some younger athletes a leg up provided they have an invite also.

      Whilst there is still the requirement that you have to compete at trials for most events I also note that there is an exemption for 10000m. So I guess Mo won't be at Highgate. Whilst I'm a tad cynical with regards to BA making an exception for Mo I think on the whole it's probably the best thing for the event in many ways

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      • #18
        I'm glad that they seem more likely to take athletes via the ranking system as the IAAF's new standards are extra tough e.g 44.90 for 400.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by trickstat View Post
          I'm glad that they seem more likely to take athletes via the ranking system as the IAAF's new standards are extra tough e.g 44.90 for 400.
          It doesn't look like too many more since most of these standards for the world rankings invitations hardly vary from WA's Olympic standards.

          For example:
          M 800 - Olympic standard 1:45.20; Rankings invitation standard 1:45.30
          W 200 - Olympic standard 22.80; Rankings invitation standard 22.82
          W 3000SC - Olympic standard 9:30.00; Rankings invitation standard 9:30.20
          Some haven't changed at all, like the 400H.

          LOL, you have to wonder what goes through the selectors' minds when they come up with this crap.

          It seems our Olympic team will be a fair bit smaller than it usually is because many (all?) of these standards for the world rankings invitations are still harder than previous qualifying standards for the Olympics.
          Last edited by LuckySpikes; 10-02-20, 12:25.

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          • MysteryBrick
            MysteryBrick commented
            Editing a comment
            They did make me laugh when I saw them...

          • miles
            miles commented
            Editing a comment
            True the standards are higher this time round, but in 2016 UKA required two qualifying standards rather than just one.

        • #20
          WORLD RECORD!!!

          12:51 for the road 5km for Joshua Cheptegei in Monaco. Jimmy Gressier set a European Record, 13:18.

          Until now the WR for this event (13:18) was a faux WR because Sammy Kipketer had run 13:00 in 2000. Not anymore.

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          • #21
            Originally posted by LuckySpikes View Post

            It doesn't look like too many more since most of these standards for the world rankings invitations hardly vary from WA's Olympic standards.

            For example:
            M 800 - Olympic standard 1:45.20; Rankings invitation standard 1:45.30
            W 200 - Olympic standard 22.80; Rankings invitation standard 22.82
            W 3000SC - Olympic standard 9:30.00; Rankings invitation standard 9:30.20
            Some haven't changed at all, like the 400H.

            LOL, you have to wonder what goes through the selectors' minds when they come up with this crap.

            It seems our Olympic team will be a fair bit smaller than it usually is because many (all?) of these standards for the world rankings invitations are still harder than previous qualifying standards for the Olympics.
            ive been having a look at the qualifiers today, we are 18 slots down on 2016 as it stands and id imagine most of those slots will be filled before the olympics - emerson in the hept, maybe duckworth in the deacathlon, hitchon in the hammer, lake in the high jump, okoye and thompson in the discus, myers in the pole vault, griffiths in the marathon, birde and clarke in the steeple, knight and turner in the 400 hurdles, ofili in the 100 hurdles, numerous girls in the 400, mcalister in the 400 hurdles hudson smith in the 400 and a few others in other events

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            • #22
              Fast race at today's Sevilla Marathon. Ethiopia's Mekuant Ayenew won in 2:04:46.

              Eyob Faniel Ghebrehiwet ran an Italian NR 2:07:19 taking 3 seconds off Stefano Baldini's record.

              Javi Guerra booked his spot on the Spanish Olympic team by winning the Spanish Championships in 2:07:27, going #3 on the all-time Spanish list.

              Ireland's Kevin Seaward ran 2:10:10, taking 3+ minutes off his PB and just 14s away from John Treacy's NR.

              Jonny Mellor also ran a PB, 2:10:58, putting himself into contention for our Olympic team.

              On her marathon debut Uganda's Juliet Chekwel won in 2:23:13.

              Marta Galimany booked her flight to Tokyo by winning the Spanish Championships in a 2:29:02 PB, her first time sub-2:30.

              At the 4th time of trying in the last year Sweden's Hanna Lindholm finally got the Olympic qualifier with 2:28:59. Jip Vastenburg ran 2:33:40 on her debut.
              Last edited by LuckySpikes; 23-02-20, 10:25.

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              • #23
                Argentinian javelin thrower Braian Toledo has died in a motorbike crash, aged just 26. He was 10th in Rio and had a PB of 83.32. He still holds the World Youth Best, 89.34, for the 700g javelin set in 2010.

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                • #24
                  Australian NR for Eleanor Patterson, 1.99 in the High Jump in Wellington.

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                  • #25
                    Originally posted by LuckySpikes View Post
                    Argentinian javelin thrower Braian Toledo has died in a motorbike crash, aged just 26. He was 10th in Rio and had a PB of 83.32. He still holds the World Youth Best, 89.34, for the 700g javelin set in 2010.
                    Shocking news, 26 is no age. Some talent although as with so many outstanding youths he never quite made the anticipated splash in the senior ranks.

                    He joins the likes of Fagernes and Bannister as top quality spearists who left us decades too soon. RIP.

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                    • #26
                      A reminder that the US Olympic Trials Marathon is on at 5pm today - details & live streaming link at the top of page 3 at https://www.dropbox.com/s/o9sib2ytu0...03-02.odt?dl=0

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                      • #27
                        Nice undulating course for the Spanish Cross Country Championships in Zaragoza today. Good noisy crowds too (maybe 2,000?), undeterred by the coronavirus!

                        It's noticeable that most/all of Spain's top distance runners turn out to run these races. For example, the men's field had Abadia, Mayo, Mechaal, Carro, Oumaiz, Lamdessam, Oukhelfen, Mateo and Chiqui Perez. The women's field was similarly stacked with the best of their current crop. By the way, Carlos Mayo won the men's and Irene Sanchez-Escribano the women's.

                        I watch a lot of Spanish races and it's not just for this race that their best runners turn out in numbers - this winter most of them have been duking it out regularly on the roads and on their fairly extensive cross-country circuit. A couple of months ago I commented that Abadia and Carro must have raced on the roads/country for at least 8 consecutive weekends and they've hardly shirked racing since then either.

                        Compare and contrast with our own English National Cross Country Championships which these days affords a cheap opportunity for a 29:30 man to call himself a national champion. Our elites just don't seem to fancy it anymore.

                        So, what is it about our British namby-pamby elite distance runners that means they don't get out and and support our races in the same way? Our men are especially guilty of this I would say.

                        Later I'll post my report of this morning's Nagoya Women's Marathon - the final chapter of Japan's MGC Challenge to finalise their Olympic team, and just like the Osaka Women's Marathon 6 weeks ago it was an exciting affair.
                        Last edited by LuckySpikes; 08-03-20, 14:26.

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                        • larkim
                          larkim commented
                          Editing a comment
                          What is the terrain like though for the Spanish races? A mud-fest like in the Nationals or Intercounties, or fast and firm ground with a lower injury risk? I'm not all over the depth of Spanish talent (!), but none of those strike me as signficantly better that those we often see at the intercounties etc.

                          Or is it more that everyone from 1500m specialists upwards takes to the roads i the winter, whereas our elites simply don't and head indoors instead? Perhaps weather is as important in this as actual interest?

                        • LuckySpikes
                          LuckySpikes commented
                          Editing a comment
                          No, those fields ARE significantly better than the fields turning out for the Intercounties & nationals in recent years, especially on the men's side.

                      • #28
                        Whilst the Nagoya Women's Marathon had assembled a solid if unspectacular field of international athletes in the 2:20 - 2:23 range, the main (only?) reason to stay up until 2.45am to watch the race was to see the denouement of Japan's MGC challenge - the 3 race series after last September's Marathon Grand Championship that was used to determine the 3rd spot on their Olympic team. In the second race in Osaka 6 weeks ago Mizuki Matsuda had beaten the original 2:22:22 target with 2:21:47 and said after the race that she didn't think any Japanese woman would beat her time in Nagoya ...

                        If you want to watch this morning's race in Nagoya, the full broadcast without ad breaks is at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TTfWOxy-_rA . Otherwise, read on.

                        ...
                        ...
                        ...
                        ...
                        ...

                        Five Japanese women toed the start-line with a sub-2:25 PB but only Yuka Ando had ever run faster than the 2:21:46 target, doing that 3 years ago in this marathon. Distance fans will probably know her as the runner whose arm carriage is so low she looks like she's carrying a very heavy invisible tray.

                        An average of 16:48 per 5km was required to beat the target and Charlotte Purdue was one of the pacers tasked with leading them at a slightly quicker tempo. Of all the pacers she was the one pushing it the hardest from the front, taking the group to 15km 12 seconds ahead of an even-pace 2:21:47 schedule. Just before this point the group of 6 Japanese women in the lead pack was whittling down to 4 - it was a surprise to see Reia Iwade (2:23:52 PB) struggling to keep contact, but less so that Kayoko Fukushi was also doing so, her best days seeming to be behind her at 37yo.

                        Halfway was reached in 1:10:26 by a group of 8 women (excluding pacers) including 4 Japanese - 35s slower than Matsuda in Osaka but crucially still on pace to finish a minute quicker than her. Yuka Ando was still there, along with 22yo Mao Ichiyama (2:24:33 PB). What wasn't expected was that the other 2 were Ai Hosoda (2:29:27 in her only marathon) and Sayaka Sato making her marathon debut, a 31:59/69:27 athlete. Neither had been deemed worthy of being assigned one of the 8 'elite bibs' for Japanese athletes.

                        Until 25km the pace continued very consistently in the 16:40 per 5km area but at 30km the first doubts started creeping in. The previous 5km had been 17:02 and if they continued at a similar pace the 2:21:47 target would start to be in doubt. However, with the lead bunch of several Africans and now 3 Japanese still together (Hosada dropped off around 24km) it was then, at the drinks tables, that Mao Ichiyama decided to make her move, reeling off a succession of kilometres around 3:14 instead of 3:20-something. By doing so she established a healthy lead over all the field including the favourites such as Helen Bekele Tola and Purity Rionoripo. This resulted in the race's fastest 5km split to 35km of 16:14.

                        So far, the race looked very similar to what happened in Osaka with Matsuda but whereas Matsuda had slowed a bit in the final 10km leading to brief doubts about her beating the target, Ichiyama instead almost maintained her pace over the last 7km ... With crowds being encouraged to stay away it was a muted welcome into the stadium with only family, coach and the volunteers there to applaud her ...
                        But, she did it and with plenty to spare, 2:20:29 to go 4th on the all-time Japanese list and more importantly to grab that Olympic spot from Matsuda. Like in Osaka, cue the celebrations and the tears! I had hoped for Matsuda that her joy in Osaka wouldn't be premature but sadly for her it was, now relegated to reserve for the Olympic team.

                        But, what a fabulous way of deciding the 3rd spot this system has been, full of tension, conjecture and drama. A bit brutal for Mizuki Matsuda though (and for original MGC 3rd placer, Rei Ohara).

                        Finally, it has to be said again that Japanese TV broadcasts of road races are terrific. They just know how to cover these events. Their 'fluff' pieces aren't even fluff pieces - just some racing footage, footage of them training and a few words from the athlete, and all the while the race is still being shown in an insert. There's no montage department doing their best to try to impress us with fancy sequences and 'clever' choices of music or graphics. Take note BBC!
                        Anyway, at one point in the closing stages - at 1:54:35 mark of the video - the camera got so close to Ichiyama that you could hear her breathing over the sound of the motorbike, commentators and the pitter-patter of rain. It's rare to hear that on a proper TV broadcast and, whilst it's a small thing, it was a good illustration of how hard she was working just to maintain her pace.

                        PS Can you tell that Japanese road racing is my new favourite athletics thing?!

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                        • #29
                          jarrion lawson got away with tainted beef crap allowed by CAS; how interesting that so many yanks get the benefit of the doubt. I thought you were responsible for what was inside you.Didnt we penalise a Brit training in SA some years ago who said the same tainted beef stuff.

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                          • LuckySpikes
                            LuckySpikes commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Hmm, there seems to be a lot of this dodgy beef around in America!! Trump needs to get a grip on the situation. Knowing how he likes to throw the weight of his office around, perhaps some sanctions on Argentina, Mexico etc would do the trick!

                          • trickstat
                            trickstat commented
                            Editing a comment
                            As I understand it, US producers can use all sorts of hormones and things on their livestock that are banned in Europe so it may not have been imported beef. That said, the application of the rules should be the same for all athletes in a similar situation. I am not against Lawson being given the benefit of the doubt if I could be sure that everyone would be treated the same way.

                        • #30
                          meanwhile... I thought someone like Ursus would have noted this... Taylor Campbell throws a PB of 74.98 m in first comp of the year

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